We need another zero

Posted By: Rise Team|Dated: June 24, 2014

Name five global Indian companies that have a uniform presence across the world. Okay, name three. One?

Finding a truly global Indian company is like searching for a needle in a haystack. Indians like Indra Nooyi and Satya Nadella are contributing significantly to FMCG, technology, medicine and software. We are a leading BPO service provider to world leading brands and financial institutions. We invented Hotmail and Bose sitting on foreign shores. Indians are a highly sought after global supply pool for some of the best brands and companies in the world. So what stops us from creating our own truly global brand?

In his convocation address to IIM Ahmedabad in March 2014, Anand Mahindra stated that Indians do not believe in themselves and constantly seek foreign validation to remind us of how good we are. Are we not confident of taking on the mighty west? Maybe, the root of this lies in the colonial dominance that once was? Or maybe, disruptive innovation, or for that matter anything disruptive, clashes with the moral and cultural fibre of our country.

Innovation is a mind-set. You can train it to run in your veins and create life-changing discoveries we are only used to contributing to. As Indians, we take great pride, and maybe consolation, in being a part of the sum rather than the sum of the parts. We are satisfied with craning our necks from the wings because sticking them out there means taking charge and more importantly, taking responsibility.

Innovation is born out of need. India is a country with 29 states, each a mini country in itself, and a population of 1.2 billion.  Every day, we find something new to grunt and groan about. Every day is also a new opportunity for change. The Tata Nano and Mahindra E2O provide answers to several global issues including fuel conservation, pollution and lack of space — but while they have garnered huge acclaim, worldwide sales figures are not exactly stellar. There could be two explanations for this. We still think at grassroots level, or we shy away from thinking big.

Innovation must transcend boundaries. Air Deccan revolutionised air travel in India by making it affordable to the common man. Yet less than a decade later, nobody even remembers the airline. If we can’t sustain our innovations in our own country, what chance do we stand in the rest of the world? There are anywhere between 9,000 to 25,000 Indian companies developing apps and being bought over by foreign companies simultaneously. How many companies are we buying?

Indian companies must find a way to create a universally acclaimed innovation that is celebrated in each and every part of the world and we welcome your suggestions to impact this change.

Let us not stop at the zero. Or continue with it.

The article is only a representation of the writer’s thoughts and would love to be proven wrong. Surprise us!

 

Subscribe to our mailing list

Sign up for the rise blog newsletter to keep up on new stories on Rise

Related Links:

  • Viraf Mehta

    Eco-solutions for motor vehicles – Bio-degradable dust protection covers for car seats and Solar panel roof tops for electrical power.

  • RAMA LINGA SWAMY

    Is there any possibility for RISE Competition “Driver-less Car” Competition can be upgraded as “CAR-LESS COLONIES (or) CAR-LESS CITIES”.
    I have a Project.
    On 5/9/14, IdeaConnection wrote:

    > Your innovation article “DRIVER LESS CAR” is now live on IdeaConnection(tm) at

    > http://www.ideaconnection.com/innovation-articles/driver-less-car-00593.html

    > IdeaConnection

    > Access Innovation

    > http://www.ideaconnection.com

  • Rajesh Ranjan

    I agree with the inspirational lines above. But what I feel is that we Indians lack ideas that may revolutionize the world. All the examples given above are from some established fields of businesses. The bottom line is we literally require another zero. Something of our own……

  • Prakash J. Lakhapate

    At present Computers are based on Binary System (0 and 1) (On or Off)
    Only 2 characters are used hence it has become bulky.
    If we use tirtiary system (0,1,2) ( On, off or Neutral)
    Because 3 characters are used the computers will become compact.
    It will consume less energy and comuter speed can be increased substantially
    Also other additional features can be added .
    We Indians should take initiative and develop the computer system which will be better than present binary system.
    Dnanyavad

  • My Provision India

    Every thing on earth will be over soon.

    How ?

    Liquid Fuel , gas Fuel, Solar Power and lots more like power .
    The row material comes from Nature over Earth and very soon every thing will get over.

    We must understand this one more example is given blow

    When I was in School (6th class) there was one chapter in my Science book which was on Over Natural resources and there importance, but in past 15 years the same book have same thing but Human(every body)never respected over Earth.

    So the Education System was good but practically we never taught to really fallow the same.

    Simple techniques which we use in past can help us to grow and if there is some one who is with me then revert on this important point.

    I have answer for every thing but i need is support.

    • http://basilthankachan.com BASIL THANKACHAN

      hi,i agree to this point.and if u need support let me know

      • My Provision India

        Thanks dear for support.
        I’m only looking for some one who can invest and be always
        with me. so who can u help me?

      • My Provision India

        One thing which changed Human was a Zero.

        Earth is round,coins are round,wheel are round,sun is round,moon is round etc………. Discovery of Zero was Important and after that we started Modifying things as per requirement………………..

        We cant clap with one hand but support can give that sound

  • Hiten Pal Saklani

    Why is India’s MAP been shown tampered with. Kashmir is still part of India !

If you enjoyed this article, keep up on new stories and conversations about Rise

×