Premlata Poonia’s migration for education: Why access to schools isn’t enough

Posted By: Rise Team|Dated: September 29, 2011

Premlata Poonia grew up among big dreams. Her father was an educator at a government school who dreamt of transforming rural India through education. He insisted that she receive the best education available. But as part of a farming family with deep rural roots, that education did not come without sacrifice.

Permlata_Poonia

To send Premlata to a good school, her family moved to a village 10 kilometers away from Likhmewada, Rajasthan, where her father worked. The better school was worth his draining commute. Premlata worked hard to live up to his efforts and was rewarded by acceptance to Maharani College of Jaipur. To support her at this recognized college in a large city, the family had to move again.

Access to schools is only the first step

Premlata’s isn’t the only Indian family to move in search of better education.  This might be surprising, given that dedicated government efforts have ensured that 95 percent of Indian children live within one kilometer of a public school.  But access to school is not necessarily access to learning.   How much good can access to a school do if teachers fail to teach?

A 2009 World Bank survey revealed that 25 percent of Indian teachers simply do not show up to work, and only 50 percent of teachers actually teach when they do show up.  What are the rest doing?  Enjoying a cup of chai, reading the paper, or chatting with colleagues.

As a result, illiteracy and dropout rates are shockingly high. In fact, education NGO Pratham reports that barely half of Grade 5 students are capable of reading simple text messages in their language of study. And only about one-third of them can solve a simple division problem. Most students drop out before Grade 10.

Room to Read, a nonprofit organization formed to improve the lives of children in developing nations by focusing on literacy and gender equity in education, indicates that 35 percent of the world’s illiterate people live in India. It estimates that by 2020, that number will rise to 50 percent.

We’ve got quantity.  Now let’s target quality

The government is taking reform seriously. From 2009 to 2010, spending on education more than doubled to reach $83 billion. The government also formed a dedicated Rural Education Cell and conducted a seminar to identify problems and develop solutions—which included improving teachers’ education and offering higher quality textbooks and learning aids.

Simple and cheap interventions can have a large impact. Pratham found that being tutored by a local community member equipped with only a week’s training helped public school students achieve double the improvement in test scores that could be attained by switching to a private school.

Other efforts seek to personalize learning to make it more engaging for each student.  Supported by the Azim Premji Foundation, 1,500 schools in In Uttarakhand are encouraging teachers to stop testing students on memorizing textbook passages, and to start helping them research and write their own stories and reports.

Premlata is proof that we should be optimistic

Premlata and her family worked hard to claim the right to a good education.  She’s been accepted into the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business, where a scholarship from the K.C. Mahindra Fellows program will support her MBA in social entrepreneurship.

Although most of her family can’t even pronounce her new school’s name, Premlata is full of enthusiasm for the tools her education will give her to improve their lives.  She plans to apply her learning about social entrepreneurship to change opportunities in rural India. It’s her hope that the good education she received will not be reserved for only those able to migrate to better schools.  Reforms of India’s educational system need to focus on the quality of local public schools so that all students live within one kilometer of an excellent education.

What challenges do you see for students and educators in rural India?  Do you think shifting teaching styles away from memorization will improve educational outcomes?  What methods do you think are promising?

 

About Premlata Poonia:

Premlata Poonia, originally from Likhmewada, Rajasthan, is a graduate of the Maharani College of Jaipur. With the support of the K C Mahindra Fellows Fund Scholarship, Premlata will be attending the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business, where she plans to earn an MBA in social entrepreneurship.

 

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  • Bajpaikanchan

    Defiantly, shifting teaching styles away from memorization will improve educational outcomes because Practical work Always shows better effect instead of memorization,in rural area where Parents want to give high education unable to get proper educational environment because of this most of the children become low educated .
    the study should be more Practical within government schools, which by student become able to learn more their surrounding.
    Thanking U 

  • http://www.facebook.com/nuthakkiarkay Nuthakki Radhakrishna

    I DO NOT KNOW whether DMK gave a thought to my many letters to the govt regarding equal education to all and introduced Samachher kalvi . But MK being Tamil language chauvanist , he did not follow my system fully . I wanted the education to be divided into two parts : 1.culture , 2. career . Subjects relating to the culture part must be in state language and the career part in English . 3rd language is optional . The level of education is to adapt CBSE SYLLABUS . CULTURE : LANGUAGE , SOCIAL STUDIES , MORALS , HISTORY &GEOGRAPHY .CAREER : MATHS AND SCIENCES AND ENGLISH LANGUAGE . If this system is adapted wherever Samacheer kalvi is adapted , this would have been THE REAL Samacheer and even JJ would not have objected . Then , the education would have been equal for rich and poor ; for urban and rural people . MK missed it because of his love and obsession to Tamil sacrificng the real career part of the education where equality is a must .
    Sixty years after Independence, the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act 2009 Act finally guarantees education for all children between 6-14 as a fundamental right – a legally binding obligation. However, the Act leaves out about 220 million children. They include those below 6 years of age – those who need to attend pre-and nursery school, which is the foundation for all education. The government’s anganwadi scheme is not legally enforceable and despite a 2006 Supreme Court order that a centre be made available “on demand” and one centre per 300 people, the coverage is extremely patchy. Yet, it is the only option available to millions of poor to feed and educate their little kids, which the Act should recognise.The Act also completely ignores children in the 14-18 years age group. On paper, India’s primary school enrolment rate is an impressive 94.5 percent but our dropout rate is as noteworthy – only 15 percent of the students reach high school. What this underlines clearly is that the Act should bring all of India’s 440 million children below 18 years of age under its ambit but it will be meaningless if we do not ensure quality education. No minimum standards have been defined in the 2009 Act for teachers, school infrastructure and facilities such as drinking water, toilets, classrooms and favourable teacher-to-student ratios. Small and yet significant things seem to make a difference. For instance, if girls do not have a separate toilet, after a certain age they stop attending school. Similarly, even though it is proven that a child learns best in his mother-tongue, the Act does not specify it as the medium of instruction, in addition to learning other languages.NO COUNTRY in the world has been able to reach universal education without public funding. An overwhelming 80-85 percent of children attend government schools in India. Yet, education expenditure actually reduced from 3.84 percent in the 2008-2009 Union budget down to 3.03 percent in 2009- 2010. With only a little over Rs 13,100 crore allocated to the government’s main elementary education scheme — Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan — the 2009 Act is heavily under-funded.The Right to Education Act, 2009, in its present form goes against the interests of both students and teachers and only benefits the managements of private schools.The Act says that “no school, other than a school established, owned or controlled by appropriate government or the local authority, shall, after the commencement of this Act, be established or function, without obtaining a certificate of recognition from such authority, by making an application in form and manner, as may be prescribed.” It provides for a number of conditions like all-weather building and playground facilities to make a school eligible for registration. The Act is silent on fee structure and teachers’ pay. This may further affect the condition of a number of ‘marginalised’ school which offer quality education. I think aping USA is not the magical solution forgetting India`s diversity in the culture and religions but the diversity is equally present economically. I will follow the inclusive growth in the field of education after the right to education This aping the west is very descriminating for the rural students ,govt. school chidren and students of non-english medium students This thought of providing level playing field must start from class one . Otherwise ,there is every chance for the students mentioned above will be marginalised more than present.
    Let us study the reports from – PRADHAM – AND WE WOULD KNOW ,HOW UNEQUAL OUR EDUCATION IS BETWEEN THE POOR,RURAL AND RICH,URBAN.
    —Hyd.news today,25/11/09The education dept.of andhra pradesh released a study document by ap state educational research institute on 24th.It had collected the opinions in 559 schools & headmasters, 1820 teachers, 5324 sthdents and 1515 parents.This study is conducted from 15th to 24th of october. 
    This study revealed the following opinions; 1 – 90 percent of the students wanted English medium of instruction. 76.12 percent preffered state board to CBSE. 2 – 72 % of the teachers are for English medium and 75 % preffer state board o CBSE. 3 – 86-6 % head masters prefer english medium and state board. 4 – 90 % parents are for English medium and 83.19 % preffer state board. The study document, basing on these opinions, indicated that English medium of instruction to be started from the 1st seandard itself,improvement in the teachers/students ratio and finally betterment of the facilities and infrastructure. 
    This study reveals the lopsided govt education and how the poor is cheated of contemporary needs of education till now.
    This is the reason , i have come up with the following idea and do the following.
    But,previous govts did not cosider the common children`s desire to do their education in english medium which is the previlege of rich.the students educated in english medium are having a big edge over in jobs and status.Two language system is enough , third language can be optional .
    Education can be divided into two parts;1.cultural 2.career.To take care of cultural part – mother tongue,social studies,morals,arts should be taught in mother tongue. to take care of career part – english (written and spoken),maths and sciences should be taught in english.So,each student gets both the parts of education simultaneously. If we can do this from next year onwards- poor students will have equal opportunity in education without burdening their parents and imagine the amount of human talent of world class but rooted to their culture.
    Unlike the system of free education upto class 8 under RTE at present , i will extend it to class 10 which is the corner stone from where the student with an enough education and age to decide his further education or career. Leaving the children at class 8 is almost leaving them in midstream without the sight of the shores.
    AFTER SEEING THE RESULT OF THE FIRST BATCH COMING OUT AFTER TEN YEARS , YOU CAN DECIDE WHETHER TO HAVE A COMMON CURRICULUM UNLIKE THE PRESENT DIFFERENT CURRICULUMS OF STATE BOARD , CBSE , MATRIC ,IISC etc
    Declining student strength in its schools has become a cause for concern for the Coimbatore Corporation. As many as 4,868 boys and girls have migrated from the 81 schools the civic body has, bringing down the student strength from 33,713 in 2007-08 to 28,845 in 2010-11.
    Majority of the students who moved over are from the primary section. As the accompanying data suggests, 3,624 of the 4,868 students are from the section.
    Sources in the Corporation’s education department attribute the students’ movement to the absence of English medium schools.
    They point out that none of the 41 primary schools has English as a medium of instruction. Parents want their wards to learn English, and private schools that offer such education are the biggest competitors, explains Anshul Mishra, Commissioner. “The civic body is very much seized of the matter. From what I have gathered, the language seems to be the biggest attraction for the parents.”
    ·          
    There are only 9 students from tamil medium out of 87 top rankers in plus two of Tamil nadu .This shows that equality is lacking in Indian education system .If you are in China, you will hardly see any signboards in English. The Chinese hardly use English as a medium of communication within the country but that is changing and the change is being brought in by generation next.
    Two weeks ago Kunming municipal officials decreed that shops with outdoor signs would have to strictly abide by a new regulation – putting up an ‘English-language logo’ – a move aimed at the drawing foreign businessmen and tourists who flock here.’You get more job opportunities. China is developing fast and you require many people who can communicate in English,” said Zhou Young, English Major student, Dianchi Inter-College, Kunming, Yunnan province.The craze for learning English peaked just before the Beijing Olympics in 2008 when the government began aiming to make China more international.
    Today, the English-learning industry in China is worth nearly 2 billion pounds. There are more than 50 thousand English-training organisations in the country.
    In Beijing alone, an estimated three lakh people attend English classes every year. The obsession to learn English runs deeper, thousands of Chinese parents are sending their children to summer camps in the US.
    After all, knowing English has its perks. It helps you climb the ladder faster in white collar China.CHENNAI: Government schools in the state may be doing much better than earlier, but not many students from these schools are making it to medical colleges. 
    According to a reply received by Makkal Sakthi, an NGO, to an RTI petition, only 2.5% of the total medical seats in government colleges went to students from government schools in 2008-09 and 2009-10. This despite 80% of students appearing for plus-two exams in the state being from government schools. 
    “The basic reasons for the poor performance of government school students are the standard of teaching and lack of parental care. In most government schools, especially in rural areas, many teachers are saddled with more number of students and the student-teacher ratio is very high. This makes it impossible for a teacher to give individual attention,” said Senthil Arumugam of Makkal Sakthi. “In rural areas, many students making it to plus-two are first generation learners. There is no proper guidance from the parents,” he said. 
    Even if a student in a government school is capable of scoring 85% marks, the teacher has no wherewithal to coach him or her to get more than 90 per cent necessary to get a medical seat. 
    Many schools, especially those in rural areas, don’t have proper infrastructure. According to a study conducted by an NGO, there are more than 14,000 teacher vacancies, including 3,000 posts of Tamil teachers, in government schools. 
    “We filed an RTI application and sought details of students from government schools getting admission to MBBS in government medical colleges. We got replies from all the government medical colleges individually. After compiling the data, we found that in 2008-09, 24 students from government schools got admission in medical colleges and in 2009-10, 26 students got admission,” Arumugam said. 
    The NGO wants the government to allocate a particular number of seats for students from government schools, a suggestion which educationists think may not be feasible. “Students from government schools are mostly from lower middle class or poor background. They don’t have the resource to go for tuitions. Poor students from government schools hardly have a chance,” said educationist Jayaprakash Gandhi. 
    The present system makes a student concentrate only on exams and mostly he ends up memorizing the particular portion. The student might score well in school through rote learning, but his knowledge of the subjects would mostly remain poor, he said. This, many felt, has defeated the purpose of doing away with the common entrance test for MBBS. 
    “Though the main aim of abolition of entrance exams was to give an equal opportunity to poor students in professional colleges, the cutoff marks are so high that these students still lose out,” an academic said.
    Amartya Sen criticises neglect of elementary education : “India does have many achievements in the success of a relatively small group of privileged people well trained in higher education and specialised expertise. Yet our education remains deeply unjust. Among other bad consequences, the low coverage and low quality of school education in India extracts a heavy price in the pattern of our economic development.”He clarified that while Mr. Nehru understood the importance of technical education, the allocation of resources for primary education gave the impression that it was not considered high on the priority list for spending.Prof. Sen regretted that primary education had insufficient coverage; there was a huge number of out-of-school children and the quality of education was low. “India needs to widen its education base radically,” he said He clarified that while Mr. Nehru understood the importance of technical education, the allocation of resources for primary education gave the impression that it was not considered high on the priority list for spending.Prof. Sen regretted that primary education had insufficient coverage; there was a huge number of out-of-school children and the quality of education was low. “India needs to widen its education base radically,” he said

  • http://www.facebook.com/nuthakkiarkay Nuthakki Radhakrishna

    I DO NOT KNOW whether DMK gave a thought to my many letters to the govt regarding equal education to all and introduced Samachher kalvi . But MK being Tamil language chauvanist , he did not follow my system fully . I wanted the education to be divided into two parts : 1.culture , 2. career . Subjects relating to the culture part must be in state language and the career part in English . 3rd language is optional . The level of education is to adapt CBSE SYLLABUS . CULTURE : LANGUAGE , SOCIAL STUDIES , MORALS , HISTORY &GEOGRAPHY .CAREER : MATHS AND SCIENCES AND ENGLISH LANGUAGE . If this system is adapted wherever Samacheer kalvi is adapted , this would have been THE REAL Samacheer and even JJ would not have objected . Then , the education would have been equal for rich and poor ; for urban and rural people . MK missed it because of his love and obsession to Tamil sacrificng the real career part of the education where equality is a must .
    Sixty years after Independence, the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act 2009 Act finally guarantees education for all children between 6-14 as a fundamental right – a legally binding obligation. However, the Act leaves out about 220 million children. They include those below 6 years of age – those who need to attend pre-and nursery school, which is the foundation for all education. The government’s anganwadi scheme is not legally enforceable and despite a 2006 Supreme Court order that a centre be made available “on demand” and one centre per 300 people, the coverage is extremely patchy. Yet, it is the only option available to millions of poor to feed and educate their little kids, which the Act should recognise.The Act also completely ignores children in the 14-18 years age group. On paper, India’s primary school enrolment rate is an impressive 94.5 percent but our dropout rate is as noteworthy – only 15 percent of the students reach high school. What this underlines clearly is that the Act should bring all of India’s 440 million children below 18 years of age under its ambit but it will be meaningless if we do not ensure quality education. No minimum standards have been defined in the 2009 Act for teachers, school infrastructure and facilities such as drinking water, toilets, classrooms and favourable teacher-to-student ratios. Small and yet significant things seem to make a difference. For instance, if girls do not have a separate toilet, after a certain age they stop attending school. Similarly, even though it is proven that a child learns best in his mother-tongue, the Act does not specify it as the medium of instruction, in addition to learning other languages.NO COUNTRY in the world has been able to reach universal education without public funding. An overwhelming 80-85 percent of children attend government schools in India. Yet, education expenditure actually reduced from 3.84 percent in the 2008-2009 Union budget down to 3.03 percent in 2009- 2010. With only a little over Rs 13,100 crore allocated to the government’s main elementary education scheme — Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan — the 2009 Act is heavily under-funded.The Right to Education Act, 2009, in its present form goes against the interests of both students and teachers and only benefits the managements of private schools.The Act says that “no school, other than a school established, owned or controlled by appropriate government or the local authority, shall, after the commencement of this Act, be established or function, without obtaining a certificate of recognition from such authority, by making an application in form and manner, as may be prescribed.” It provides for a number of conditions like all-weather building and playground facilities to make a school eligible for registration. The Act is silent on fee structure and teachers’ pay. This may further affect the condition of a number of ‘marginalised’ school which offer quality education. I think aping USA is not the magical solution forgetting India`s diversity in the culture and religions but the diversity is equally present economically. I will follow the inclusive growth in the field of education after the right to education This aping the west is very descriminating for the rural students ,govt. school chidren and students of non-english medium students This thought of providing level playing field must start from class one . Otherwise ,there is every chance for the students mentioned above will be marginalised more than present.
    Let us study the reports from – PRADHAM – AND WE WOULD KNOW ,HOW UNEQUAL OUR EDUCATION IS BETWEEN THE POOR,RURAL AND RICH,URBAN.
    —Hyd.news today,25/11/09The education dept.of andhra pradesh released a study document by ap state educational research institute on 24th.It had collected the opinions in 559 schools & headmasters, 1820 teachers, 5324 sthdents and 1515 parents.This study is conducted from 15th to 24th of october. 
    This study revealed the following opinions; 1 – 90 percent of the students wanted English medium of instruction. 76.12 percent preffered state board to CBSE. 2 – 72 % of the teachers are for English medium and 75 % preffer state board o CBSE. 3 – 86-6 % head masters prefer english medium and state board. 4 – 90 % parents are for English medium and 83.19 % preffer state board. The study document, basing on these opinions, indicated that English medium of instruction to be started from the 1st seandard itself,improvement in the teachers/students ratio and finally betterment of the facilities and infrastructure. 
    This study reveals the lopsided govt education and how the poor is cheated of contemporary needs of education till now.
    This is the reason , i have come up with the following idea and do the following.
    But,previous govts did not cosider the common children`s desire to do their education in english medium which is the previlege of rich.the students educated in english medium are having a big edge over in jobs and status.Two language system is enough , third language can be optional .
    Education can be divided into two parts;1.cultural 2.career.To take care of cultural part – mother tongue,social studies,morals,arts should be taught in mother tongue. to take care of career part – english (written and spoken),maths and sciences should be taught in english.So,each student gets both the parts of education simultaneously. If we can do this from next year onwards- poor students will have equal opportunity in education without burdening their parents and imagine the amount of human talent of world class but rooted to their culture.
    Unlike the system of free education upto class 8 under RTE at present , i will extend it to class 10 which is the corner stone from where the student with an enough education and age to decide his further education or career. Leaving the children at class 8 is almost leaving them in midstream without the sight of the shores.
    AFTER SEEING THE RESULT OF THE FIRST BATCH COMING OUT AFTER TEN YEARS , YOU CAN DECIDE WHETHER TO HAVE A COMMON CURRICULUM UNLIKE THE PRESENT DIFFERENT CURRICULUMS OF STATE BOARD , CBSE , MATRIC ,IISC etc
    Declining student strength in its schools has become a cause for concern for the Coimbatore Corporation. As many as 4,868 boys and girls have migrated from the 81 schools the civic body has, bringing down the student strength from 33,713 in 2007-08 to 28,845 in 2010-11.
    Majority of the students who moved over are from the primary section. As the accompanying data suggests, 3,624 of the 4,868 students are from the section.
    Sources in the Corporation’s education department attribute the students’ movement to the absence of English medium schools.
    They point out that none of the 41 primary schools has English as a medium of instruction. Parents want their wards to learn English, and private schools that offer such education are the biggest competitors, explains Anshul Mishra, Commissioner. “The civic body is very much seized of the matter. From what I have gathered, the language seems to be the biggest attraction for the parents.”
    ·          
    There are only 9 students from tamil medium out of 87 top rankers in plus two of Tamil nadu .This shows that equality is lacking in Indian education system .If you are in China, you will hardly see any signboards in English. The Chinese hardly use English as a medium of communication within the country but that is changing and the change is being brought in by generation next.
    Two weeks ago Kunming municipal officials decreed that shops with outdoor signs would have to strictly abide by a new regulation – putting up an ‘English-language logo’ – a move aimed at the drawing foreign businessmen and tourists who flock here.’You get more job opportunities. China is developing fast and you require many people who can communicate in English,” said Zhou Young, English Major student, Dianchi Inter-College, Kunming, Yunnan province.The craze for learning English peaked just before the Beijing Olympics in 2008 when the government began aiming to make China more international.
    Today, the English-learning industry in China is worth nearly 2 billion pounds. There are more than 50 thousand English-training organisations in the country.
    In Beijing alone, an estimated three lakh people attend English classes every year. The obsession to learn English runs deeper, thousands of Chinese parents are sending their children to summer camps in the US.
    After all, knowing English has its perks. It helps you climb the ladder faster in white collar China.CHENNAI: Government schools in the state may be doing much better than earlier, but not many students from these schools are making it to medical colleges. 
    According to a reply received by Makkal Sakthi, an NGO, to an RTI petition, only 2.5% of the total medical seats in government colleges went to students from government schools in 2008-09 and 2009-10. This despite 80% of students appearing for plus-two exams in the state being from government schools. 
    “The basic reasons for the poor performance of government school students are the standard of teaching and lack of parental care. In most government schools, especially in rural areas, many teachers are saddled with more number of students and the student-teacher ratio is very high. This makes it impossible for a teacher to give individual attention,” said Senthil Arumugam of Makkal Sakthi. “In rural areas, many students making it to plus-two are first generation learners. There is no proper guidance from the parents,” he said. 
    Even if a student in a government school is capable of scoring 85% marks, the teacher has no wherewithal to coach him or her to get more than 90 per cent necessary to get a medical seat. 
    Many schools, especially those in rural areas, don’t have proper infrastructure. According to a study conducted by an NGO, there are more than 14,000 teacher vacancies, including 3,000 posts of Tamil teachers, in government schools. 
    “We filed an RTI application and sought details of students from government schools getting admission to MBBS in government medical colleges. We got replies from all the government medical colleges individually. After compiling the data, we found that in 2008-09, 24 students from government schools got admission in medical colleges and in 2009-10, 26 students got admission,” Arumugam said. 
    The NGO wants the government to allocate a particular number of seats for students from government schools, a suggestion which educationists think may not be feasible. “Students from government schools are mostly from lower middle class or poor background. They don’t have the resource to go for tuitions. Poor students from government schools hardly have a chance,” said educationist Jayaprakash Gandhi. 
    The present system makes a student concentrate only on exams and mostly he ends up memorizing the particular portion. The student might score well in school through rote learning, but his knowledge of the subjects would mostly remain poor, he said. This, many felt, has defeated the purpose of doing away with the common entrance test for MBBS. 
    “Though the main aim of abolition of entrance exams was to give an equal opportunity to poor students in professional colleges, the cutoff marks are so high that these students still lose out,” an academic said.
    Amartya Sen criticises neglect of elementary education : “India does have many achievements in the success of a relatively small group of privileged people well trained in higher education and specialised expertise. Yet our education remains deeply unjust. Among other bad consequences, the low coverage and low quality of school education in India extracts a heavy price in the pattern of our economic development.”He clarified that while Mr. Nehru understood the importance of technical education, the allocation of resources for primary education gave the impression that it was not considered high on the priority list for spending.Prof. Sen regretted that primary education had insufficient coverage; there was a huge number of out-of-school children and the quality of education was low. “India needs to widen its education base radically,” he said He clarified that while Mr. Nehru understood the importance of technical education, the allocation of resources for primary education gave the impression that it was not considered high on the priority list for spending.Prof. Sen regretted that primary education had insufficient coverage; there was a huge number of out-of-school children and the quality of education was low. “India needs to widen its education base radically,” he said

  • Rajanishkirad

    compare to 1)pvt school n colleges with 2)govt schools n colleges there is very high salaries and more facilities  for children an teachers from govt. but u see the difference between in this two. in 1) low salary,high discipline, systematic timing, responsibility, classrooms are fresh,updating things. in govt only teacher are getting benefits but he not justifying to his institution are students why because the control is not in his     hand it is in govt control………… my idea is govt should give a chance to a team who belong to that village or city to run the institution with his own response,and no transfer till retirement.if there any special reason for transfer r death recruite another person who belongs to that place only.gave them a target every year, then see they give tough computation to pvt institutions.

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