Akshara Stories: Amit

Posted By: Rise Team|Dated: August 16, 2013

I am Amit from Asade village at the foothill of the Mahindra United World College (MUWCI) at Mulshi. For the first few years of my life, I remember there was no electricity in our village. After the sun set, there was not much one could do in the dark. Though other homes now do have electric connections, mine till date is in darkness. This is because it has not been easy to earn too much or to have any extra money. My father is a confirmed alcoholic my elder brother is following my father’s footsteps in every way. Many a times, I had to go to the fields late at night, looking for my father, who in complete inebriation; was in no state to find his own way home.

Amit

I remember a time when he did not even realize that a truck had gone over his hand rending it useless. Of course, this was used to further advantage by sticking to a drunken state as much as possible, till date.

The state of the women in my family was naturally worse. My mother got violently beaten up by my father under the influence of alcohol. It was her brother (my maternal uncle) who managed to provide some grain and essential necessities so that we could survive.

Fortunately, Asade was one of the lucky villages that had a school. This was the only escape that I had from the constantly depressing domestic scene at home. I was in the 8th grade in this school (2008) when I first heard about Akshara. I did not know anything about Akshara at that point except that they had something to do with The Mahindra United World College of India (MUWCI). It was but natural that the idea of being able to go to the MUWCI campus was aspirational for me. I wanted to see a campus that is known for its facilities and the kids who come from all over the world to study. And I figured out that the baby step to reach MUWCI was through Akshara. With dreams in my eyes beyond my means, I connected with Akshara. I was in 8th Std. then, with family circumstances as they were and no one to guide.

By the end of 8th grade, thanks to Akshara, I was interested in studies and had gained a different and thinking perspective on life. I no longer reacted by hitting or abusing others. I realised that people paid more attention to me when I spoke to them rather than when I bullied them. The most surprising thing was how the girls and ladyteachers were treated. I realized I could respect them, as well and be friendly with a few as well. This was not something I could have thought possible before Akshara. But because they made us do things together, I came to change my feelings about girls.I became more sensitive towards women due to the discussions that took place in Akshara.

The range of topics that were discussed was large. From caste issues, dowry and alcoholism to women’s position in society. Akshara gave me the opportunity to discuss these issues and to express my opinion.I remember working on a sanitation project; interacting with the juniors as well as seniors to successfully complete it. The chance to explain the importance of cleanliness to the village elders gave all of us immense confidence and a feeling of achievement.But the passion “to make a difference” was unabating. The burning desire to rise above my circumstances, made me resolve to try and get into the Mahinddra United World College. Finally, fuelled with my aspiration and with help from Akshara, after 10th grade I joined Foundation Programme at MUWCI to prepare me for IB studies.

I think I did well enough in the Foundation Program at MUWCI after grade 10 as I was selected to go and do my IB at UWC Pearson College, Canada.

I have now completed the first year and am looking forward to getting back to the campus for my second year. I have made friends of various nationalities and backgrounds.

I am going to continue to be focussed on my studies in spite of any troubles at home. I know that this is what is important right now if I want to be able to make a difference to my mother’s lifeand my life- rise above my circumstances and make a difference to me and the world. I am on my way now to do my 2nd year at Pearson College Canada, to complete my IB.I am sure I have succeeded in rising above my circumstances and will succeed in life to make a difference to my family, my village community,country and the world at large.

Thank you MUWCI, Thank you Akshara!

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  • http://pepsiipl6live.blogspot.com/ manoj

    that was great

  • Rahul Dixit

    Hello everyone, is there anyone who had ever thought to design an engine in INDIA. “INDIANS” we are been called as working horses in other countries, everyone in this whole world believes that we are the country of youth, hard work, smart work and knowledge. But still we require to buy technology form other countries. What’s the reason behind this? The answer is, the work done in the field of “TECHNICAL RESEARCH AND
    DEVELOPMENT” is nearly zero. Or I would say ‘NIL’. My question is why there is no opportunity provided to young talents to show there skills, in this (Research & Development) field?
    Being a Mechanical Engineer I have designed two “ENGINES” One which will save fuel and the other engine don’t require fuel to work. While I have developed an idea according to which a vehicle can be driven by using magnetic waves.
    Such innovations are of no use, as i only have done paper work, can’t make a working machine model due to lack of funds.
    I think it’s a big reason that our country is still developing, as new talent don’t get opportunity.
    Just like me there might be many “ENGINEERS” how have many innovative ideas, but no work. And no one know them and don’t even give them a chance to prove there knowledge and talent.
    Why this happens? can anyone answer, Please…

  • http://awsmstatus.blogspot.com Minesh.parikh

    Awesome Article…….recommended Whatsapp Status

  • A1 Whatsapp Status

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